Blog.

Green Writers Press
  • “We are a woman-owned publishing company and we are actively seeking diversity in terms of our authors and characters.” I'm honored to support the quite excellent Green Writers Press and thankful to The Brooklyn Rail for making this fab piece happen.

    Please do check out "Verdant Voices: The Women of Green Writers Press" at The Brooklyn Rail here, and please let me know if you would like to learn more about any of these books or any of these authors (or any other of the many terrific Green Writers Press books or authors) any further because we will so make that happen. Please also enjoy some excerpt below.
     

    Rail: Megan, I know it was critical to you to work with women as your poetry touches on some difficult subjects of mental illness and sexual assault. As female authors, how do you think working with the female leadership of the press and beside other female authors through this whole process has impacted your journey to authorship?

    Alice: Working beside other women has impacted me in the sense that I would not have written about the injustices of being a woman had I not been around and seen all of these injustices that other women face. Some of the stories in my book are not just from my personal experience, but also from my sister’s and my mom’s. Women, as a collective, have similar stories that are being told in the #MeToo Movement. These are stories that we universally connect with and feel the need to share because they are important. These are stories that must be told.

    I would not have wanted to publish my book through anything other than a female-centered company. It would not have felt right to me any other way because so much of my book is based on the experiences of women. I am a woman and half of my donations are going to Planned Parenthood, so of course I want to work with women through this whole process. My literary agent is a fantastic woman, and so is Dede, and my editor. I think women empowering other women is one of the things that this world really needs right now.

    Epstein: Working with a female editor at a women-owned press definitely impacted my writing process. In one of the chapters in my book, I discuss body-image and what it was like living with my father as an adolescent and teenager, as well as not having my mother present in my life to guide me through those challenging years.

    I think working with a female editor made it easier for me to come out of my comfort zone and write more explicitly and honestly about some very painful subjects that still affect me as an adult. I'm not sure I would have felt as comfortable working with a male editor. This is not to say that I think men lack the capacity or empathy to discuss these issues openly and honestly, or that men are not affected by body image issues—of course they are! However, I do think perhaps, that it is a more relatable subject for women then for men.

    Kunin: Well I don’t think gender always plays a huge role [in the editorial relationship], but in the case of my book, it made a difference that Dede understood what I was getting at. I think some men could capture that too; I don’t think you have to be a female person, but it helps.

    Watkins: I always find working with women such an enriching experience. I developed close relationships with Christine Eberle and two other women who haven’t published yet. We bounced ideas off each other, supported each other when we thought we couldn’t do this anymore, and have continued to support each other as we move through this process. At home, my writing group is primarily female and we support each other not just in our writing but in the real world as well. Women are just there for each other in ways that men are not.

  • "I’ve wanted to be a writer since I was ten years old, but I have never felt like I quite fit in regarding the “real-world” society." Let's talk Lifeforce by Annie Rodriguez. Reviews, interviews, think pieces and hype would be nice as well.

    As the universe inexplicably continues to chug along despite, or is it in spite, of the current state of the world, I'm really honored to support efforts to bring Lifeforce by Annie Rodriguez out into the wider world. To quote her interview at Fanbase Press:

    BD: What inspired you to tell this sci-fi/fantasy story?

    AR: I’ve wanted to be a writer since I was ten years old, but I have never felt like I quite fit in regarding the “real-world” society. Also, the fields that I work in, anthropology, public health, and, in the near future, law, give me all the real-life experience I could want. I chose to write fantasy as a means to daydream and escape from reality a little bit. But I also wanted people to know that life is not always greener on the other side.  No matter if you think someone has an advantage, magical powers for example, does not mean that person does not have problems. Life happens to everyone, and we need to recognize that.


    I couldn't agree more. Further, I don't think this book could be more timely.

    Please let me know if you have any questions and/or are interested in reviewing the book, interviewing the author, writing think pieces or generally engaging in the hype we're looking to generate for this most timely of books. For much more on all things Lifeforce please do go here.

  • Sarah Ward and Aesop Lake are Book Bites.

    And big thanks to the splendiferous Steph Post for that. You can read the Book Bites interview in its entirety here and some excerpt below. Enjoy. Order. Hype. Thank you.

    What drew you to the genre you write in?

    Ever since I was barely an adolescent myself I wanted to write for young adults. This age group is always relevant, carving new paths into the way our culture thinks and behaves, and yet there is something so familiar to their experience that we can relate to the pain, and the sweetness, of moving from childhood into adulthood. As a parent of two young adults, and a youth group leader at a Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, I have spent a lot of time talking with teens and early twenty-somethings. They are brimming with energy, passion and discovery. When I worked as a clinical social worker, my favorite clients were young adults, because they always came in with such bravado, but when treated with respect and kindness they opened up very quickly. I find that writing for them is just as satisfying. I believe that we shouldn’t “write down” to what we think is safe; we should challenge young adults with difficult topics and real-life situations. I also find that adults enjoy YA as much as the youth, as we have all been there, and can relate on so many levels. 

  • On yet another God-awful and hate filled day it's truly an honor to be associated with the quite wonderful debut novel Aesop Lake. That it would receive such a glowing review is no surprise for those of us who love it.

    Did I mention that the review is from Kirkus? Well it is, and you can read the review in its glorious entirety here. You can also read some excerpt below. Cool? Enjoy.

    "Emphasizing that there’s no shame in recovering at your own pace but no refuge from responsibility either, three illustrated Aesop fables punctuate the well-paced novel, reinforcing the messages imparted... The reprehensibility of not being an ally is communicated without proselytizing, and a discussion guide serves as a conversation starter for this difficult subject... A mindful dissection of how allied strength can combat hate."

  • Much appreciated The Full Vermonty: Vermont in the Age of Trump excerpt at TNBBC's The Next Best Book Blog.

    Thrilled to see "The Full Vermonty: Vermont in the Age of Trump" excerpted at TNBBC's The Next Best Book Blog, and yes much appreciated. Excerpt (of said excerpt) love below.

    "Readers, I think you know I've managed to steer clear from taking any sort of political stance on this blog over the years. Mostly because TNBBC focuses on literary fiction, but also because I feel book blogs should be safe spaces that don't push political or religious agendas at their followers. They should be places you and I turn to when real-life craziness threatens our sanities.

    "Today, though, I am going to temporarily break my own rule and share a cartoon excerpt from The Full Vermonty, which released back in September with Green Writers Press, a Vermont-based, global publisher whose mission is to spread a message of hope and renewal. My good friend Ben Tanzer is the publicist for this title and I'm thrilled to be able to help him spread the word!

    "Readers, be warned.. if you are Trump supporter, you may wish to skip this post. Just sayin'.

    "Here we go...."